Best software to predict plate development

Discussion in 'Software' started by BTboatie88, Aug 5, 2023.

  1. BTboatie88
    Joined: Aug 2023
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    BTboatie88 Junior Member

    What is the best program for plate development with aluminium hulls up to 6mm thick.

    I have modeled some boats in Solidworks using surfaces but they don't come out perfect when I flatten them then get them laser cut.

    I guess it's because I am "forcing" the sheets to compound curve more than the sheets natural flex.

    Is there a software that will predict what plates will naturally curve without having to press/form them?
     
  2. HJS
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    HJS Member

    I use Delftship Pro and am very happy with the results. The important thing is that the surfaces are really developable. This requires you to understand how the plate bends, especially in the forward part of the bottom.
    JS
     

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  3. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Welcome to the Forum.
    SolidWorks sucks at plate development in general, but also it won't tell you that the plate is non-developable. Unless you are aware when conducting the design, it is very easy to end up with a "furnace" plate that needs to be hot formed. If you have the money, I would suggest you switch to RHINO. It will help you significantly with making sure the plates are developable.

    It is important to remember that SolidWorks is a solids modeler, not a surface modeler. Here is an explanation

    https://blog.udemy.com/rhino-3d-vs-solidworks/#:~:text=In this blog, I will,Rational B-Splines) surfaces.
     
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  4. BTboatie88
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    BTboatie88 Junior Member

    Is there a formula or guidelines on how to predict the flex of the plate up the front end?
     
  5. BTboatie88
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    BTboatie88 Junior Member

    Is there a specific tool you use in rhino? I'd like to look up some YouTube videos on the subject before considering switching.
     
  6. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    RHINO has the ability to plot the Gaussian Curvature in the developed (i.e. "unrolled") plate; this is a measure of how much cross curvature there is remaining in the nominally "flat" plate. If it is all identically equal to zero, the plate is "fully developable". If there is a very small bit of curvature, generally towards the edges or ends; then the plate could be "tortured" into place. Any minor cross curvature would have to be formed, generally by heating or shrinking (i.e. general yard plate fitting/flange turning). Major cross curvature would require typical "heat and beat" buck forming. Additionally, there where (last time I used RHINO was 2018) add-ins that could force a surface to be fully developable (i.e. I know it is in the ORCA 3D add-on, and there are other, cheaper, add-ins just to ensure plate development).
     
  7. BTboatie88
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    BTboatie88 Junior Member


    Are there any good videos you know that show how to do this on rhino?
     
  8. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    The problem is that when "flattening" from 3D with a surface deviating from strict multi-conic shape, the algorithms will adjust the mesh so that the sum of changes is a minimum. When this flat surface is "unflattened" again, it will no longer fit. The trick is to use a program that will create the correct flat shape that will give the least deformed "unflattened" shape, and also indicate where you will have the maximum 3D deformation. I found the "Mesh Unfolder 3" after some search, and I have used it to correct the flattened shapes from the KeyCreator (former CadKey) that I use. Simple to use and inexpensive.
     
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  9. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    In addition to my previous post I'd like to draw your attention to the fact that a hull panel, say a bottom with a varying deadrise can not have straight transverse sections. This is a common beginner's mistake, designing the bottom with straight sections. That will result in a non-developable surface.

    Edit: ...and I have noticed the same issues with Solidworks as Jehardiman; darn frustrating and I had no one to ask, but fiddling a "benchmark shape" back and forth between SW and KC I finally came to the conclusion above.
     
  10. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    What about if all those straight sections have the same vertex, that is, they belong to the same cone?. I'm not saying, I'm just asking.
     
  11. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    ...referring to the previous sentence, saying "transverse sections". The note is not aiming at a complete decription of the multiconic principle; it is a mere reminder!
     
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  12. BTboatie88
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    BTboatie88 Junior Member


    Do you have a video or some screenshots of what you are talking about? I am not familiar with those programs and a visual aide would help.
     
  13. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    No, but if you can show the part of your hull where you see problems, it is probably easier to explain. It is not a question of programs or which button to press, but understanding the procedure; its the same when done manually on the plank.
     
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  14. HJS
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    HJS Member

    Here you can see how I put the control lines to get the foreship as I want it and be developable.
     

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  15. BTboatie88
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    BTboatie88 Junior Member

    Are there any guides, books or video on how to do it the right way? I am guessing this is the part I am struggling with.
     
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